Meduxnekeag Lake, Maine, USA

Lake Locations:

USA - New England - Maine - Aroostook County -

Also known as:  Drews Lake, Drew's Lake

For the perfect Northern Maine hideaway, there’s nothing better than Meduxnekeag Lake in Aroostook County. Also called Drew’s Lake, Meduxnekeag was created in 1947 when a small dam was built across the headwaters of the Meduxnekeag River. The resulting impoundment is 1,144 acres of inviting water, wooded scenery and wild nature. Private except for a public boat launch on the eastern bay, the lake holds relatively few homes and cottages along its 18-mile shoreline. The reason for much of the solitude is that there are few all-season roads in the area, and snow this far north gets deep enough to make the few private roads impassable. Year-round homes are limited to the north shore, with very few cottages at the south end. Meduxnekeag Lake is far from sources of light pollution, making the stars appear larger than life and close enough to touch. It’s the kind of place that begs for plaid flannel shirts and ghost stories around the campfire at night.

According to State reports from 1989, Meduxnekeag Lake holds American eel, pumpkinseed sunfish, yellow perch, chain pickerel, white perch, rainbow smelt, splake (a hybrid of lake trout and brook trout), redbreast sunfish, lake chub, landlocked salmon, brook trout and brown trout. The trout are the most sought-after species by visiting fishermen. The incoming small streams and the shallow, rocky shoals make for great fly fishing. Ice fishing is allowed, with restrictions placed by the State as to times and creel limits. It is best to obtain a current copy of Maine fishing regulations as they change often. Streams and lakes in this area of northern Maine are known for excellent trout fishing; several locations for accessing other lakes are nearby, including Nickerson Lake State Park less than five miles away.

The Meduxnekeag River flows east into the St. Johns River near the border with Canada. Traditionally, the Maliseet Native American tribe, headquartered in Houlton, have hunted and fished the St. Johns River valley and have international permission to cross the border between tribal settlements unhindered. The tribe’s craftsmen make beautiful baskets out of native materials which can sometimes be found for sale in the area.

Little information is available for Meduxnekeag Lake. Repots from State sources are several years old, and the lake doesn’t have any major resorts or glitzy websites devoted to it. Several islands dot the surface, some large enough to hold cabins. The Drew’s Lake Property Owners Association bands together to solve problems and monitors water quality in conjunction with state-wide groups. A few years ago, they raised enough money to buy the dam from the State and rebuild it. The result is a small but cohesive community where neighbors look out for each other and their precious lake, monitor the number of chicks hatched by the resident loon parents, catch trout and socialize. The only public road ends at the boat ramp, with the rest private roads and private property. There are several wetland areas along the shoreline.

Little boating information is available, and there are no marinas or fuel locations on the shore. Although motorized boats are allowed, canoes and kayaks are ideal for paddling silently along the shoreline to sight moose, bald eagles, waterfowl and various mammals. Meduxnekeag Lake regularly has real estate for sale, often existing homes. Building lots are also available, and several-acre lakeview parcels are surprisingly inexpensive. There are no campgrounds on the lake, but camping areas and small resorts are found within a 10-mile radius. Small motels and guest rentals are common in the area, often on nearby lakes.

Two small villages are located near Meduxnekeag Lake: Linneus and New Limerick. They offer gas, a few supplies and services. Linneus also has a highly-recommended restaurant known for good seafood dishes. The area is mostly potato farms, the major crop in this agricultural area other than timber products. The ‘big city’ nearby is Houlton, almost 10 miles to the east. Houlton, in typical tongue-in-cheek Maine humor, says that it is best known for being the ‘end of I-95’. Just east of town is the customs entry point to New Brunswick, Canada. Houlton is larger than other towns in the area; the thriving small city of 6,000 people is the main services hub for the area. Founded over two hundred years ago, several preserved homes in the town appear on the National Register of Historic Homes.

The Aroostook Historical & Art Museum is worth a visit, as is the Hancock Barracks. The Barracks was occupied by the local militias in the “Bloodless Aroostook War”. No shots were fired in the border incident that kept the area on edge in 1839-1839, an international incident that was finally settled when the United States and Britain agreed to a negotiated border line between the US and Britain’s colony, New Brunswick. Houlton offers shopping, a variety of dining choices and entertainment in the form of golf courses, movie theaters and nightspots. The Houlton Visitors Center is part of the Maine Solar System Model; this model places the sun and planets at different places along Route 1 in Aroostook County. Houlton is the home of the dwarf planet Pluto; the sun in this system is 38.6 miles to the north in the Northern Maine Museum of Science at Presque Isle. Children will want to visit this three-story museum on the campus of the University of Maine at Presque Isle. It’s worth the trip and a very good smaller museum with many educational exhibits.

Hunters and back-country fishermen alike will be able to find all types of guide services locally. Moose are commonly seen in the area on nature walks, and country roads are great for cycling and nature observation. Cross-country skiing and snowmobiling are favored winter activities. In fact, Aroostook County claims over 2,300 miles of snowmobile trails, often along power line right-of-ways and abandoned railroad beds. Maine is the perfect spot for antique hunters to spend a week or two searching the local small shops for the ideal item. Because Maine was a sea-faring center for most of the 19th century, one-of-a-kind items still show up near the coast that were originally brought home by the captains of schooners that called at exotic ports around the world.

Meduxnekeag Lake, or Drew’s Lake, is the perfect place to get off the beaten path. Life is simpler here away from the interferences of modern living. Interaction with civilization can be on your terms. A few weeks or months at Meduxnekeag Lake, and it will be hard to return to city living. Come experience the solitude and the relaxing sound of waves washing along the shore of Meduxnekeag Lake.

Things to do at Meduxnekeag Lake

  • Vacation Rentals
  • Fishing
  • Ice Fishing
  • Boating
  • Canoeing
  • Kayaking
  • Golf
  • Camping
  • Campground
  • Cabin Rentals
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Cross-Country Skiing
  • Snowmobiling
  • Hunting
  • Birding
  • State Park
  • Museum
  • Movie Theater
  • Antiquing
  • Shopping

Fish species found at Meduxnekeag Lake

  • Brook Trout
  • Brown Trout
  • Carp
  • Chain Pickerel
  • Eel
  • Lake Trout
  • Perch
  • Pickerel
  • Pike
  • Pumpkinseed
  • Redbreast Sunfish
  • Salmon
  • Smelt
  • Splake Trout
  • Sunfish
  • Trout
  • White Perch
  • Yellow Perch

Meduxnekeag Lake Photo Gallery

Meduxnekeag Lake Statistics & Helpful Links

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Lake Type: Natural Freshwater Lake, Dammed

Water Level Control: Drews Lake Property Owners Assoc.

Surface Area: 1,144 acres

Shoreline Length: 17 miles

Normal Elevation (Full Pond): 484 feet

Average Depth: 18 feet

Maximum Depth: 49 feet

Completion Year: 1957

Trophic State: Mesotrophic

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Trophic State | LakeLubbers

Trophic State measures the level of algae and nutrients in a lake.

An oligotrophic lake is very clear (blue in color) and does not support much plant or fish life. A hyper-oligotrophic lake is the clearest of all lakes, and is nearly devoid of plants and fish.

A mesotrophic lake is slightly green and supports a moderate degree of plant and fish life. A lake's most desired trophic state is generally this mid-point - the mesotrophic state.

A eutrophic lake is somewhat murky and supports a large amount of plant and fish life. A hypereutrophic lake is clouded with algae, plant life, and fish life. A eutrophic or hyper-eutrophic lake can be difficult to navigate by boat - and is often an unpleasant place to swim.

The use of phosphorus-rich and nitrogen-rich fertilizer on lawns and golf courses surrounding a lake can cause it to become eutrophic or hypereutrophic.


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Catchment or Drainage Area | LakeLubbers

This is the surrounding area that drains into a lake, including land, rivers and their tributaries. This is also known as the lake's "catchment basin".

Small lakes at the highest peaks of mountains have small drainage areas. The world's oceans have the largest drainage areas.


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Lake-Area Population | LakeLubbers

This is the estimated number of people who live in a house with a view of a lake, plus those who self-describe the lake as their home, for example: "I live at Smith Mountain Lake."


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Water Residence Time | LakeLubbers

This is the estimated time that it takes for an amount of water equal to the entire volume of a lake to flow out of - or evaporate from - the lake.

Residence Time can be as short as a few days for fast-flowing small lakes, and can exceed 100 years for slow-flowing large lakes.


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Completion Year | LakeLubbers

This is the year that a reservoir was first filled to the reservoir's normal elevation - or the year that a natural lake was first dammed. A large reservoir can take more than a year to fill after its dam is first closed.

The Grand Anicut in southern India is generally considered the world's oldest dam that still operates. Grand Anicut was constructed in the second century BC. It now impounds an irrigation network that includes roughly one million acres.

You can find many of the the world's newest reservoirs on LakeLubbers. Many of the world's oldest reservoirs appear on the last page of that list.


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Water Volume | LakeLubbers

This is the estimated volume of water that a lake contains -- measured at the lake's normal elevation. By this measure, the world's largest freshwater lake is Siberia's Lake Baikal.

You can find many of the the world's largest lakes (by water volume) on LakeLubbers.

Water Volume can be measured in acre-feet, in cubic miles, or in cubic kilometers. One acre-foot is the amount of water needed to cover one acre (43,560 square feet) to a depth of one foot. One cubic mile equals 3,379,200 acre-feet. One cubic kilometer equals 810,713 acre-feet.

1 acre-foot is equal to 325,851 US gallons. Siberia's Lake Baikal contains about 6,276,367,740,000,000 gallons of freshwater - nearly 1 million gallons for every living person on earth.

The other - and more widely used - measure of a lake's size is the lake's surface acreage. By that measure, the world's largest freshwater lake is North America's Lake Superior.


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Maximum Depth | LakeLubbers

This is the estimated greatest depth of the water in a lake -- measured at the lake's normal elevation. The world's deepest lake is Siberia's Lake Baikal; that lake's maximum depth is estimated at 5,314 feet.

You can find many of the the world's deepest lakes on LakeLubbers. If you select the last page of that list, you will find the (maximum depth of) the shallowest lakes in our database.


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Average Depth | LakeLubbers

This is the estimated average depth of the water in a lake -- measured at the lake's normal elevation. If the water volume and surface area of a lake are known, an estimate of the lake's average depth can be calculated:

Water volume ÷ Surface Area = Average Depth

Example: 1,000,000 acre-feet ÷ 20,000 acres = 50 feet average depth


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Maximum Elevation | LakeLubbers

This is a lake's highest water level, measured by the lake's surface distance above sea level, that can occur during flooding. A lake's highest possible maximum elevation is usually the top of the lake's dam or spillway.

At lakes that include residential development, government regulations usually forbid the construction of homes below a lake's maximum elevation.


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Minimum Elevation | LakeLubbers

This is a lake's lowest water level, measured by the lake's surface distance above sea level, that can be reasonably expected to occur. Low lake levels can occur due to deliberate seasonal draw downs for irrigation or impending snow melt, reduced water inflows, drought and evaporation, residential or commercial water demands, and hydropower generation.

Some lakes' minimum and maximum elevations are virtually the same. Lakes that generate hydropower may vary by several feet - according to power demand. Lakes whose primary purpose is to prevent flooding can seasonally vary by 100 feet or more.

When some lakes reach their minimum elevation, their boat ramps may not be long enough to permit boat access - and boats docked on shallow parts of the lake may end up on dry ground. In those cases, kayakers and shore-based anglers may be among the few happy recreational users of the lake.


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Normal Elevation | LakeLubbers

This is a lake's normal water level, measured by the lake's surface distance above sea level. For a reservoir, this water level is also known as "full pond" or "full pool".

You can find many of the world's highest-elevated lakes on LakeLubbers. Lakes with the lowest elevations (known by LakeLubbers) are shown on the final page of that list.


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Shoreline Length | LakeLubbers

This is the length of the exterior shoreline around a lake - measured at the lake's normal elevation. The shoreline length can be considerably shorter or longer when lake water levels are lower or higher than normal.

A lake with many coves has a much longer shoreline than a lake of similar surface area that is nearly circular in shape.

When known, the shoreline miles that we report in our statistics include only the lake's exterior shoreline, and exclude the shorelines of islands located within a lake's boundaries. In lakes with many islands, those islands' combined shorelines may exceed a lake's exterior shoreline.

You can find many of the world's longest-shoreline lakes on Lakelubbers.


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Surface Area | LakeLubbers

This is the area (acreage, square kilometers, etc.) of the top surface area of a lake - measured at a lake's normal elevation. The surface area can be considerably smaller or larger when lake levels are lower or higher than normal. North America's Lake Superior is the world's largest freshwater lake by this measure.

The other measure of a lake's size is the lake's water volume. By that measure, the world's largest freshwater lake is Lake Baikal in Siberia.

You can find many of the world's largest lakes (acres) on Lakelubbers. There is no widely-accepted minimum surface area that defines a lake. What Lakelubbers describes as a lake, you might call a pond. The smallest lake that Lakelubbers currently includes is Hawaii's 2-acre Lake Waiau.


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Water Level Control | LakeLubbers

This is the organization that controls water releases or outflows from the lake or reservoir. In the USA, this is often the US Army Corps of Engineers, a power company, a municipal water system, an irrigation district, or a paper manufacturing company. In the case of private or gated lakes, a homeowners' association may be the lake's controlling authority.

Many lakes cross borders, including North America's Great Lakes. The control of such lakes and their coveted freshwater may be amicably shared - or hotly disputed.

"Water wars" continue at many lakes as growing populations and crop irrigation needs compete for the freshwater that lakes contain.


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Lake Type | LakeLubbers

There are 3 basic types of lakes that are currently included on LakeLubbers. 2 types may be dammed or not dammed, producing 5 classifications.

- A Reservoir is a man-made freshwater lake that is usually created by damming rivers.

- A Natural Freshwater Lake occurs naturally - often by glacial activity - and has a salinity of less than 30 parts per thousand. It may be dammed to produce electricity or for other reasons.

- A Natural Saltwater Lake occurs naturally and has a salinity of more than 30 parts per thousand (ppt). It may be dammed.

"Brackish" water may be categorized as freshwater or saltwater, depending on its salt content (salinity). Oligohaline water has less than 15 ppt of salt. Mesohaline water has 15-29 ppt. Polyhaline has 30-335 ppt.


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